Tenova Awarded by University of Toronto

On November 14, the University of Toronto selected Tenova Goodfellow as 2018 SME Partner of the Year for its commitment to supporting collaborative research.

The future of the metals industry is heading in a clear direction: sustainable production and circular economy. In order to pursue this path, Research & Development plays a fundamental role, and Tenova is especially investing in precious collaborations with academic institutions to investigate new technologies.

On November 14, Tenova Goodfellow, Canadian center of excellence for process control technology development within Tenova, received the award 2018 SME Partner of the Year by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto for its cooperation with the Laboratory for Strategic Materials of ProfessorGisele Azimi.

The team’s initiative to transform the steelmaking industry into an environmentally sustainable platform has generated the publication of high impact papers and intellectual property, and the team at Tenova Goodfellow has truly gone above and beyond to support this collaborative program”, declared Professor Azimi.

The collaborative project has three objectives: investigating high temperature materials to improve the design of Tenova furnaces and sensors for an improved steelmaking control; finding innovative ways to valorise steelmaking waste material; and learning and verifying the advantages and limitations of molten metal electrolysis for the steel industry.

The partnership has been very positive. We gained fundamental knowledge on high temperature materials and on the actual composition of steelmaking waste, obtaining interesting results for all the objectives. In particular, the waste valorisation portion of the project has already provided few good insights on how to better transform the waste material into a valuable resource.We expect to gain interesting insights to further develop our business”, stated Vittorio Scipolo, Chief of Technology at Tenova Goodfellow.

The project – partly funded through Canadian national and regional public funds – kicked off in June 2017 and will last four years.